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A Broken 3D Printer Inspired This Futuristic Fabric – Gizmodo Australia

3D printers usually work by extruding long strings of molten plastic onto a surface. When MIT Media Lab researchers spotted a broken printer squirting out plastic…

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3D printers usually work by extruding long strings of molten plastic onto a surface. When MIT Media Lab researchers spotted a broken printer squirting out plastic erratically, they had an idea: By programming a normal home 3D printer, they could simulate that erratic extrusion and create a sort of light, flexible lace out of hot plastic.
Jack Forman, a graduate student at MITs Media Lab, turned these defective prints called DefeXtiles into a tulle-like quasi-textile that can even be used in clothing….

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